• Health Insurance

    Health insurance terms to know as open enrollment begins : Life Kit : NPR

    Do you ever feel like health insurance is confusing on purpose? There is so much jargon and so many acronyms. It’s tempting to just close your eyes and point at a plan, hoping that it’s in your budget and covers the stuff you’ll need it for. But putting in a bit of time to learn what these health insurance terms mean can empower you to better understand what signing on to a plan might mean for your budget and your health. Now’s the time to get in there because fall is open enrollment season. Whether you’re picking a plan for  

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  • Health Insurance

    Insurance Focused on Virtual Visits? The Pros and Cons of a New Twist in Health Plans

    Julie Appleby, Kaiser Health News At the height of the covid-19 pandemic, people often relied on telemedicine for doctor visits. Now, insurers are betting that some patients liked it enough to embrace new types of health coverage that encourages video visits — or outright insists on them. Priority Health in Michigan, for example, offers coverage requiring online visits first for nonemergency primary care. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, selling to employers in Connecticut, Maine and New Hampshire, has a similar plan. “I would describe them as virtual first, a true telehealth primary care physician replacement product,” said Carrie Kincaid, vice president  

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  • Health Insurance

    Too young for Medicare? Here are 5 health insurance options to try instead

    Too young for Medicare? Here are 5 health insurance options to try instead Millions of soon-to-be seniors are watching with envy this week as open enrollment for Medicare begins. While there were high hopes President Joe Biden would lower the qualifying age from 65 to 60 through his massive Build Back Better plan, we now know that’s not going to happen. So what’s a person to do if they’ve left the workforce, along with their employer-provided health insurance, but are still too young to apply for Medicare? Fortunately, there’s more than one way to get your hands on reliable, affordable  

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  • Health Insurance

    Unvaccinated people may have to pay more for health insurance

    by: Matt Wright, Nexstar Media Wire Posted: Oct 10, 2021 / 12:30 PM CDT / Updated: Oct 9, 2021 / 01:33 PM CDT CLEVELAND (WJW) – You may wind up having to pay more for health insurance if you are not vaccinated against COVID-19. More employers and insurance companies are considering raising health insurance premiums for employees who choose to forego vaccination. Starting in November, Delta Airlines will charge unvaccinated employees an extra $200 a month for the company health plan, citing the high cost of COVID hospitalizations. “It’s similar to what already occurs with smokers,” said Tom Campanella,  

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  • Health Insurance

    For federal employee health insurance, it’s never if, but how much?

    It’s practically inevitable that health insurance rates for federal employees and retirees will go up each year, and it’s no different for 2022. Participants in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) can expect to pay, on average, about 3.8% more toward their health premiums in 2022, the Office of Personnel Management announced last week. Overall premiums will go up — again, on average — 2.4% next year, with the government’s share rising by about 1.9% in 2022. That’s actually a relatively modest bump, at least compared to recent years. FEHB participants paid an average of 4.9% more toward their  

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  • Health Insurance

    UnitedHealthcare acquires Golden Valley-based health plan PreferredOne

    UnitedHealthcare has acquired PreferredOne, a health insurer based in Golden Valley, in a deal that promises to help the nation’s largest insurer compete for business in its home state. The transaction closed Monday morning, said Hayes Batson, the chief financial officer of Fairview Health Services, which took full ownership of PreferredOne in early 2016. Financial terms were not disclosed. The acquisition was a strategic move for UnitedHealthcare, which in 2017 announced a push for a bigger piece of the Minnesota health insurance market. Historically, PreferredOne stood as the fifth largest of the non-profit carriers in the state. A spokesman for  

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  • Health Insurance

    New York City Retirees Brace for Switch to Medicare Advantage

    Starting in January 2022, over a quarter million former New York City government workers and their dependents are set to be shifted off Medicare and on to privatized health insurance. Mayor Bill de Blasio and the Municipal Labor Committee, which represents retired New York City employees, announced the move in mid-July, following several months of scrambled protest from bewildered retirees. The plan has been cast as a necessary measure to rein in mounting health care costs and reduce strain on the city’s budget. While public sector retirees in New York City are currently insured by Medicare, the federal government’s program  

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  • Health Insurance

    201K Marylanders get health insurance in special enrollment

    More than 200,000 Maryland residents have gained health insurance coverage during a coronavirus special enrollment period. ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — More than 200,000 Maryland residents have gained health insurance coverage during a coronavirus special enrollment period. Maryland Health Connection announced Tuesday that a total of 201,141 people had enrolled since March 2020. The 17-month special enrollment in response to the pandemic was one of the longest of any state in the country. It was extended several times as the emergency continued and ended Aug. 15. About 63% enrolled in Medicaid, and 27% enrolled in private plans and qualified for financial  

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